Problem water is considered water with high iron content, a sulfur smell, or a high chlorine content from city water.

Find Out if Your Home’s Water is Safe

How do you know if the water coming out of your faucet is safe?  You’ve heard all the stories recently in the news about contaminated water with bacteria, lead, and pollutants.  There is a wealth of information from verified organizations you can access to better educate and resolve water issues you face within your home.  It’s a matter of knowing where to research to find what is in your home’s water.

  • If your home is on city water, the city is required by law to test the water on a regular basis.  Every water supplier is required by law to provide each homeowner a Consumer Confidence Report before July 1st each year, which is an annual water report detailing any contaminants in the water and at what level they tested and what health risk they pose for your family.  Another method to find a CCR is to go to the water supplier’s website or contact your water supplier directly and request a CCR.  Keep in mind, water testing is tested at the water plant and test results may be different then what is supplied at your home.  Why? Read more

Needing a Sediment Pre-Filter

Have you ever wondered if you need a sediment pre-filter with your water softener?  It all depends on the type of water entering your home.  Homes on private wells are more likely then city supplied homes to need a pre-filter in conjunction with their water softener. Your best bet is to have your water tested by a local water professional.  They will be able to tell you if you need a pre-filter installed before your water softener. 

It is often recommended a sediment pre-filter be installed with a water softener, not because the water softener can’t do its job, but to remove particulate from the water the water softener won’t remove.  A sediment pre-filter, acts like a furnace or oil filter, in that it traps sediment, sand, and debris the well might kick up from entering the water softener.  It acts as a protector from sediment entering and plugging the water softener and causing an unnecessary service call.   It will also help with iron reduction in that it will catch particles of iron too.  The filter will need to be changed, on average 3-6 months, depending on the water entering your home and the volume of water used.

Cloudy Water

Have you ever poured a glass of water and seen hundreds of tiny bubbles in the glass, maybe even a milky color?  Within a minute the water clears up from the bottom to the top and the glass of water looks normal again.  The cloudy water is due to tiny air bubbles in the water.  These tiny air bubbles are completely harmless and not pose a health risk.  Read more

Iron Bacteria in Water

Not all iron is the same. Many homes on well water in Northeastern Illinois are subjected to different types of iron such as ferrous iron, ferric iron, and iron bacteria. Many people are familiar with ferrous and/or ferric iron because it will stain clothes and water fixtures. Both ferric and ferrous iron in your water are easily removed using Read more

What is this pink slime?

Have you ever seen a pink substance in your bathroom toilet, shower, or tile? Don’t be alarmed, you’re not alone. Many homeowners experience this issue. What is it? It is known as serratia marcescens, otherwise known as “pink slime”. It is an airborne bacterium, not harmful to humans or pets, with an abundant supply in our environment. The bacteria will grow in wet areas, such as bathtubs, toilets, sinks, and tiles, with materials containing phosphorus or fatty substances. It is more commonly seen in the summer months when windows are open and the air has moisture. The bottom line, it’s a complete nuisance. Read more